Peak District

The Peak District National Park is an area of outstanding beauty.
 
The very first National Park in the country, famous for great walking,
 
stunning views and so many places of interest, history and fun to visit.
 
This video gives a glimpse into just what is available and on our doorstep…The Peak District National Park is an area of outstanding beauty.
 
The very first National Park in the country, famous for great walking,
 
stunning views and so many places of interest, history and fun to visit.
 
This video gives a glimpse into just what is available and on our doorstep…

The Peak District

The Peak District National Park is an area of outstanding beauty. The very first National Park in the country, famous for great walking, stunning views and so many places of interest, history and fun to visit.

This video gives a glimpse into just what is available and on our doorstep…

The Peak District is an upland area in central and northern England, lying mainly in northern Derbyshire,but also covering parts of Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, and South and West Yorkshire.  Most of the area falls within the Peak District National Park, whose designation in 1951 made it the first national park in the British Isles. An area of great diversity, it is conventionally split into the northern Dark Peak, where most of the moorland is found and whose geology is gritstone, and the southern White Peak, where most of the population lives and where the geology is mainly limestone-based.  Proximity to the major cities of Manchester and Sheffield and the counties of Lancashire, Greater Manchester, Cheshire, Staffordshire and South and West Yorkshire coupled with easy access by road and rail, have all contributed to its popularity.

Other Attractions in the Peak District

There are  lots of things to do, take a look at some of the videos of the surrounding Peak District National Park…

Dovedale

is an area of outstanding beauty and is only a short distance from Elton Holidays. The River Dove marks the border between Derbyshire and Staffordshire in the very heart of the Peak District National Park. There are many great walks from the River Dove, as well as taking in the nearby other nearby famous Dale of the Manifold Valley.

Rock Climbing

Rock Climbing is very popular in the Peak District. Enthusiastic come from all over the World to climb some of the most difficult climbs  you can find. The varying degrees and different rock types, from Limestone to Gritstone can be found. Elton Holidays is an excellent location for every part of the Peak District and a great central base for climbing, as well as walking, cycling, canoeing and motor-biking.

The Monsal Trail

The Mondal Trail is a disused railway track that carried passengers from Bakewell to Buxton and back again if they wanted. Now it is one of the famous Peak District Trails so many walkers love to visit. The four tunnels that used to be closed are now open to the public for walking, cycling and horses. The views from the track are truly breathtaking!

The Heights of Abraham

The Heights of Abraham is located in the Derbyshire Dales area of Matlock Bath. Once a spa town and famous Victorian retreat to take the waters, now a thriving holiday destination that strangely has a sea-side feel to it with its promenade along the River Derwent, parks galore and an adventure playground for children and adults alike. The Heights of Abraham is able to be reached by cable car and the views are seriously worth it. There is lots to do when you get up there too. Take a look at the video below.
 

Gulliver's Kingdom

This is a fantastic day out for toddlers and children up to the age of 13 although anyone young at heart will have a great day.  There are amazing rides and themed attractions from the Western World and Pirates play area to the log flume and Drop Tower.  It really is worth a trip and like the Heights of Abraham,  is located in Matlock Baths in the Derbyshire Dales.

 

The Peak District National Park

With an estimated 22 million visitors per year, the Peak District is thought to be the second most-visited national park in the world (after the Mount Fuji National Park in Japan). The Peak District forms the southern end of the Pennines and much of the area is uplands above 1,000 feet (300 m), with a high point on Kinder Scout of 2,087 feet (636 m). Despite its name, the landscape generally lacks sharp peaks, being characterised by rounded hills and gritstone escarpments (the “edges”).

The area is surrounded by major conurbations, including Huddersfield, Manchester, Sheffield, Derby and Stoke-on-Trent. The National Park covers 555 square miles (1,440 km2) of Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire, Greater Manchester and South and West Yorkshire, including the majority of the area commonly referred to as the Peak.

Its northern limits lie along the A62 road between Marsden and Meltham, north west of Oldham, while its southern most point is on the A52 road on the outskirts of Ashbourne in Derbyshire. The Park boundaries were drawn to exclude large built-up areas and industrial sites from the park; in particular, the town of Buxton and the adjacent quarries are located at the end of the Peak Dale corridor, surrounded on three sides by the Park.

The town of Bakewell and numerous villages are, however, included within the boundaries, as is much of the (non-industrial) west of Sheffield. As of 2010, it is the fifth largest National Park in England and Wales. In the UK, the designation “National Park” means that there are planning restrictions to protect the area from inappropriate development and a Park Authority to look after it, but does not imply that the land is owned by the government, nor that it is uninhabited.

The Kinder Trespass in 1932 was a landmark in the campaign for national parks and open access to moorland in Britain. At the time, such open moors were closed to all; they were strongly identified with the game-keeping interests of landed gentry who used them only 12 days a year. The Peak District National Park became the United Kingdom’s first national park on 17 April 1951. The first Long distance footpath in the United Kingdom was the Pennine Way, which starts at the Nags Head Inn, in Grindsbook Booth, part of Edale village.